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lq:volume-4-issue-2

LQ Volume 4 Issue 2

Reading notes for the fourth volume and second issue of The Library Quarterly.

To return to the list of notes on this volume: volume-4

Article 1

This entry is about:

Butler, Pierce. (1934). James Christian Meinich Hanson. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 127-135. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302055

Note: The first article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “James Christian Meinich Hanson.”

It was written by Pierce Butler, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: University of Chicago

Note: J. C. M. Hanson retires from the University of Chicago. Butler, then associate editor of LQ and faculty at University of Chicago, writes a biography of Hanson. Article includes a bibliography. First work is dated 1889 and last work is dated 1934 (this last work is Hanson's article in the previous issue: notes).

Hanson's long career was a boon to the development of cataloging. There doesn't seem to be an introduction to this issue, nothing that frames it, but this issue is unlike the others so far in that it contains 30 articles, and many of these are about cataloging and classification and some are about Hanson.

Article 2

This entry is about:

Ansteinsson, John. (1934). Dilemmas of Classification. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 136-147. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302056

Note: The second article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Dilemmas of Classification.”

It was written by John Ansteinsson, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Tekniske Höiskole

Note: The author wrestles with some very fundamental problems with classification, and these problems deal not only with aboutness but also with direction. Consider an experiment by a chemist and one by a physicist, each examining much the same thing but from different perspectives:

The subjects of the two investigations are to a large extent identical, the results coincide almost entirely, or at least to such an extent that the two authors are disputing over the priority. Nevertheless, the problem has been attacked by them from different points of view, even with different aims in view, and in any case through different methods. The one probably is physical chemistry, the other one perhaps chemical physics. According to the two systems of classification most in use in America, the one would go into physics, the other into chemistry. But the walls of our pigeonholes are smashed to pieces by the incessant bombardment of radiations from the restless atoms oscillating between our nicely built-up compartments, all of which want to occupy the same space in our system (p. 140).

Note: On a book with many topics:

Are we to pick our book to pieces and scatter it in the various places in the system where the different parts belong, or are we to put it into one of them which will do justice to only a minor part of the contents (p. 141)?

Note: What I enjoy about these early classification and cataloging articles is how well they bring to light the attempt to form and complete a rational system.

Article 3

This entry is about:

Arnesen, Arne. (1934). How Norway Became the Focus of American Library Methods in Europe. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 148-155. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302057

Note: The third article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “How Norway Became the Focus of American Library Methods in Europe.”

It was written by Arne Ansteinsson, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Deichmanske Bibliotek

Note: Really interesting history of modern libraries in Norway. On introducing the Dewey system:

With regard to sixteenth- to eighteenth-century books it may safely be said that the introduction of D.C. was an act of violence (p. 151).

Next he says, in a rather nice way, that it was the best available to them at the time.

Note: Note on systems of charging:

The old charging ledgers in book form had been given up before his time, but he exchanged the established slip system with another of English origin. During a short stay in England in 1900 he became acquainted with the American Browne system, which he introduced upon his return. Some years later (1908), the Browne system was also abandoned on account of its slow operation at the delivery desk. It was replaced by the Newark system, which at that time was already in use in other Norwegian libraries (p. 151).

Note: Lots more on the specifics of various functions of the library at the time. Also, details about the influence of American libraries and library practices on Norway, including education of librarians.

Article 4

This entry is about:

Bay, J. Christian. (1934). Women Not Considered Human Beings: A Bibliological Curiosity. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 155-164. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302058

Note: The fourth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Women Not Considered Human Beings: A Bibliological Curiosity.”

It was written by J. Christian Bay, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: John Crerar Library

Note: The author quotes from a quarto that was written in Latin. Does not translate and assumes that the reader will be able to translate.

Note: Very progressive (for the time):

The thesis that woman is of an inferior clay and therefore socially and legally negligible, was exploded long ago. Women now function in all professions, indeed even as librarians, and excel beyond measure in physical, political, and academic competition with man everywhere, some nearly abrogating their cultural state (p. 156).

Note: This is largely a bibliology. Not sure why the author is arguing against the above premise (he does so as if the premise is current and he is attempting to discount it).

Article 5

This entry is about:

Bishop, William Warner. (1934). J. C. M. Hanson and International Cataloging. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 165-168. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302059

Note: The fifth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “J. C. M. Hanson and International Cataloging.”

It was written by William Warner Bishop, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: University of Michigan Library

Note: A nice intro that puts cataloging in historical perspective from the 1934 vantage point:

Few of the younger librarians of the present day can realize or fully understand the situation of cataloging in the nineties of the last century. Libraries in Britain and America were mostly small, as we now count numbers. In Europe there were more of the sizeable sort, almost all of the learned or “scientific” type. What agreement on cataloging practice had been reached in any country was chiefly based on certain well-known codes intended for very large libraries—the British Museum Rules, the Bodleian rules, the Bibliothèque Nationale rules, and the foreshadowings of the Prussian and the Austrian Instructions. In America, breaking away in part from these examples, Mr. Cutter had published two editions of his Rules for a dictionary catalogue, first in 1876. There were certain practices reduced to rules by the New York State Library School (p. 165).

The paragraph continues. What strikes me about it is that even Cutter's rules today are presented as if they were created *ex nihilo*. This paragraph, all by itself, puts the entire enterprise in context.

Note: The following is an interesting footnote. After making a statement, Bishop writes in footnote 6:

I am writing this on the ocean far from any books of reference for verifying what I trust are fairly accurate recollections (p. 165).

Note: As far as I can tell, there is finally a straightforward indication that this issue is dedicated to J. C. M. Hanson. On Hanson's work to develop “preliminary edition of the Anglo-American Code of catalog rules (p. 166), Bishop writes:

No one claims it is perfect, but it is a great piece of constructive work, due to the labor of many able men, but guided by one whom we honor in this group of articles (p. 167).

Note: Nice explanation of the intent behind the above named rules. This has been the intent of various rules and schemes (perhaps but more broadly) unto this day:

One feature of Hanson's work is but little understood. His aim—and that of his committee—was to make a code usable and indispensable for great libraries, but also capable of being followed in smaller and more popular libraries without serious vexation and undue confusion (p. 167).

Note: This achievement cannot be understated:

Ninety-nine out of a hundred titles in the ordinary library can be and are cataloged with printed cards made under this code. It requires a genius for concrete statements and for clearness to make this sort of result possible (p. 167).

Article 6

This entry is about:

Childs, James B. (1934). Author Entries for Canadian Government Publications. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 169-174. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302060

Note: The sixth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Author Entries for Canadian Government Publications.”

It was written by James B. Childs, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Library of Congress

Note: Begins with a brief history of Canada and then lists the names to use as author entries for various Canadian government organizations, departments, boards. I have no idea why this is in LQ. It could be very appropriate for the journal, but the author does not provide much of any reasoning. Not sure why this is an issue dedicated to Hanson, either.

Article 7

This entry is about:

Currier, Thomas Franklin. (1934). The Whittier Leaflet “Pericles.” The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 175-178. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302061

Note: The seventh article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The Whittier Leaflet 'Pericles.'”

It was written by Thomas Franklin Currier, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Harvard College Library

Note: Another bibliology. These are interesting pieces that deserve their own historical inquiry. Perhaps someday.

Article 8

This entry is about:

Dieserud, Juul. (1934). The Abbreviation of Imprints. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 179-184. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302062

Note: The eighth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The Abbreviation of Imprints.”

It was written by Juul Dieserud, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Washington, D.C. (No Affiliation)

Note: The first sentence of this article helps put this issue in context.

I feel very much honored by the request to furnish a brief article on some library subject for the number of Library quarterly devoted to my esteemed former chief of the Catalog Division of the Library of Congress (p. 179).

Note: I like this if only because it provides some insight into the academic background on the author (a librarian):

In 1900 he [J. C. M. Hanson] recommended me for a position in the Library of Congress as revisor of cataloging—I am sure rather on the strength of personal knowledge of my philological degree from the University of Oslo than for the reason of my slight seven years' experience as a cataloger and later librarian of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago (p. 179).

Note: The article is, as the title suggests, about the use and rules of abbreviations in cataloging. It is, at times, humorous. Some remarks on enforcing a practice of collecting daily statistics on the daily work of LC catalogers:

From my own experience of some forty years I unhesitatingly say that this would spell disaster to the accuracy of the output, in addition to reducing the force to a nervous, irritated body of works with chronic dyspepsia (p. 183).

Article 9

This entry is about:

Dorf, A. Th. (1934). The University of Chicago Libraries: A Historical Note. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 185-197. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302063

Note: The ninth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The University of Chicago Libraries: A Historical Note.”

It was written by A. Th. Dorf, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Brooklyn, New York (No Affiliation)

Note: This article is a valuable history of both J. C. M. Hanson's work at the University of Chicago Libraries but also of the libraries themselves. Any future work on the history of libraries should reference this article and its contents.

Note: Nice quote:

It was one of Mr. Hanson's axioms that “there is no short-cut to anything, least of all in library science” … (p. 196).

Note: Might be interesting to examine someday, as a thesis / hypothesis:

Nor did he hesitate to point out, which is customary honesty, that the larger the library the more costly the addition of each book. “Increasing perfection and completeness of the catalogs reduce expense, but growth will of itself increase it” (p. 196).

Note: Important historical note on Hanson's view of librarianship:

It remains to say a word about the development of a library staff. Mr. Hanson himself was an excellent, though a severe, teacher. His own standards were high, and he insisted that these standards be maintained by his staff. Some of this staff he brought with him from the Library of Congress; others he himself trained to the special needs of the university library. It was his firm conviction that the library science was an exacting one, and he insisted that assistants serve an apprenticeship before they were given positions of responsibility. The chief bibliographer, for example, was required to work for several years in the bookstacks and the classification department before he was given an opportunity to work in his special field (p. 196).

And:

Mr. Hanson was particularly anxious to avoid, in library work, the narrow specialization that is characteristic of so much of American life. Foreign library journals and publications were distributed among the members of the staff who, in his opinion, had the maturity to profit by them, and they were given an opportunity to review these articles at the regular monthly meetings of the staff where the various problems of the library administration came up for discussion (p. 197).

Article 10

This entry is about:

Drachmann, A. G. (1934). Call Numbers. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 198-206. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302064

Note: The tenth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Call Numbers.”

It was written by A. G. Drachmann, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: University Library

Note: Begins with a very neat description of the University Library in Copenhagen, Denmark before call numbers were used. Insightful. And then describes the process of incorporating call numbers into the system given various constraints.

His proposal, or at least his arguments for his proposal, seem overly complicated and based all too much on reasoning than on some evidence. But I shouldn't judge too harshly from this far into the future.

Article 11

This entry is about:

Farrell, Colman J. (1934). The Classification of Books in Libraries. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 207-222. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302065

Note: The eleventh article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The Classification of Books in Libraries.”

It was written by Colman J. Farrell, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: The Abbey Library

Note: This is a critical review of a book on classification written by a Henry Evelyn Bliss. It's a good review and I'm not finding much to discuss, but the author raises are very good question:

The all-important question, which Bliss's book raises in the mind of a classifier of books, is this: why does the author propose to discuss the problems of book classification and, straightaway, enter into a discussion of the divisions of knowledge? Even if there were some kind of identity, why does he choose to discuss the problem in terms of knowledge rather than in terms of books (p. 213)?

And then Farrell writes:

This is not a question of “logical” versus “arbitrary” procedure, but a question of deductive versus inductive procedure (p. 213).

Note: More humor:

It was a formula which led the man with eight white horses and two black horses to kill all the white horses when he observed that the white horses ate more than the black horses (p. 220).

And so Farrell's criticism in two sentences:

The method of the author [Bliss], therefore, is to “conceive” classes. The method of the Library of Congress is to investigate the literature to “discover” the classes (p. 220).

It's a delightful critique – without overtly stating it, it draws upon a lot of Western philosophy – including Kant.

And this is very scathing:

Professors of book classification in library schools will be forever indebted to Bliss for this capital illustration of the distinction between book classification and the classification of knowledge, between the classification of material things as they exist in nature and the classification of the limited conceptual knowledge as it exists in individual minds. It is one of those things which fairly defies explanation until one can illustrate it by means of a concrete example (p. 221).

This topic should really be revisited. The argument weighs heavily on the more modern issue of the organization of information as opposed to the organization of things:

in the organization of knowledge there can be no correlation of the abstract with the concrete, but merely a division of an abstract whole into immaterial parts. The second distinction is found in the procedure: classification of books is necessarily synthetic; organization of knowledge can only be analytic (p. 222).

Note: After highlighting some of the imperfections inherent in the Library of Congress classification schedule, Farrell write:

The aspect of the Library of Congress classification schedules with which the present writer has not been able to find fault is the theory and method which they are grounded. They seem to be unimpeachable; and it is a most singular and unfortunate phenomenon that the profession as a whole has remained oblivious, during the past thirty-five years and apparently to this day, of the true nature of the work being done in the national library (p. 222).

Note: I'm interested in the fact that the author of this article is a monk of the Order of Saint Benedict (O.S.B) and is writing from an abbey in Atchison Kansas.

Note: Bliss was not always well received (as he was not here): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_E._Bliss.

Article 12

This entry is about:

Frauendorfer, Sigmund von. (1934). Classification Problems in an International Special Library. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 223-233. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302066

Note: The twelfth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Classification Problems in an International Special Library.”

It was written by Sigmund von Frauendorfer, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: International Institute of Agriculture

Note: The main gist of the article is the difficulty in adapting and applying a classification system in a special library. I don't have much to say about this piece. It is probably most interesting to those who are concerned with the classification of specific fields of study (in this instance, agriculture) and to those who manage libraries with a patron base that is international.

Article 13

This entry is about:

Jacobsen, Karl T. (1934). The Reorganization of the Library of a Small College. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 234-243. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302067

Note: The thirteenth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The Reorganization of the Library of a Small College.”

It was written by Karl T. Jacobsen, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Luther College

Note: Presents an image of a small college library. Historically important for that alone. Important aspect: when the librarian was hired in 1920, it seems he was given full faculty status. See page 236, end of 2nd paragraph, for the sentence.

Note: The author, as a librarian, had to reclassify and re-catalog the collection. Used LC. Students' appreciation of the library apparently increased as a result of the reorganization and more used the library and more became interested in librarianship.

If the constant increase in the use of the books corresponding to the progress of the re-cataloging process experienced in this library is any criterion, it certainly would indicate that the character of the catalog and classification has made a very decided difference in the reaction of the students toward the library. This is also reflected in a somewhat different way in the number of students and graduates of the college who have become interested in librarianship as a life work during the past ten years (p. 239).

Good example of the relationship between how the library is presented to patrons and how often the patrons use the library.

Note: Information-literacy by any other name. On library instruction:

For the freshman, two lectures by the college librarian as a part of the college orientation course have been followed by a practice period in groups of twenty-five or less. This year an attempt is being made to supplement this procedure by co-operation with the course in freshman English (p. 240).

Detailed account of library instruction follows the above paragraph. For example:

This has resulted in what virtually amounts to individual tutoring by the librarian of the more than 125 freshman. The topics assigned, all biographical, have been such that to find the material available the students have had to make use of the various tools of the library, particularly the catalog and periodical indexes and a considerable number of reference books, both general and those connected more closely with the specific topic of the student. In each case the student was required to look up all the material he could find in the library on his topic and—except in a few instances where the material was very extensive and a selection had to be made—to record these references in accurate bibliographic form (pp. 240-241).

The librarian graded the above work and that grade was used by the English professor as part of the final grade. Collaboration.

Note: Expense details on page 242. And circulation details on page 243.

Article 14

This entry is about:

Koch, Theodore W. (1934). New Light on Old Libraries. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 244-252. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302068

Note: The fourteenth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of *The Library Quarterly* is titled “New Light on Old Libraries.”

It was written by Theodore W. Koch, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Northwestern University Library

Note: This is a historical outline of library buildings from antiquity to the present date of the article. Contains cultural history. The article was a nice read and contains five plates of images of libraries.

Article 15

This entry is about:

Koenig, Walther F. (1934). Ernesto and Eugenio do Canto: A Contribution of Azorean Bio-Bibliography. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 253-264. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302069

Note: The fifteenth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Ernesto and Eugenio do Canto: A Contribution of Azorean Bio-Bibliography.”

It was written by Walther F. Koenig, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Oldenburg, Germany (No affiliation)

Note: This is, as the title suggests, both a biography and a bibliography. Not sure why it's printed in this issue that is, essentially, a dedication to Jameson. I may not have stated this explicitly before, but there is no editorial introduction to this issue (or to any of the other issues in the volumes under study).

That aside, I like the idea of a bio-bibliography.

Article 16

This entry is about:

Lamb, Eliza. (1934). The Expansive Classification in Use. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 265-269. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302070

Note: The sixteenth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The Expansive Classification in Use.”

It was written by Eliza Lamb, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: University of Wisconsin Library

Note: An account of the University of Wisconsin Library's use of Cutter's expansive classification. Short, insightful read.

Article 17

This entry is about:

Lichtenstein, Walter. (1934). Library Education. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 270-273. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302071

Note: The seventeenth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Library Education.”

It was written by Walter Lichtenstein, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Chicago, Illinois (No affiliation)

Note: An interesting comment on library schools / education, which comes after a comment on education as an example of mass production:

So also in our library schools much time is spent in teaching pupils how to catalog, how to order books, how to classify the books for the shelves when received, what is the best manner of distributing them to the people, etc. Much less time seems to be spent in teaching what books really are, what differentiates one book from another, what type of books a particular library had better specialize in, and how the people ought to get the most out of libraries (p. 270).

Although the article begins with some good comments, as above, it uses those comments as premises to derive invalid conclusions. One of the conclusions drawn in this article is that library schools cannot teach people to know books as well the specific academic fields can and, therefore, academic libraries should be staffed by scholars and not librarians.

I don't mind arguments against library schools or library education, but the arguments presented in this article are foolish. The author would have served his argument better if he had continued his argument against library education rather than arguing, implicitly by support of other academic fields, that it could never suffice. This is the first *LQ* article in these first four volumes that left me rather annoyed.

Article 18

This entry is about:

MacPherson, Harriet Dorothea. (1934). The Anonymous Classic and Some Problems of Its Cataloging. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 274-281. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302072

Note: The eighteenth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The Anonymous Classic and Some Problems of Its Cataloging.”

It was written by Harriet Dorothea MacPherson, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Columbia University

Note: Quite a delightful read about cataloging anonymous works; issues include: the selection of main or added entry, state of knowledge with historical and literary scholarship on authorship of texts, the nature of texts (e.g., epics, fairy tales), and so forth.

Article 19

This entry is about:

Merrill, William Stetson. (1934). Order of Books by Date under Subjects. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 282-284. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302073

Note: The nineteenth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Order of Books by Date under Subjects.”

It was written by William Stetson Merrill, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Oconomowoc, Wisconsin (No affiliation)

Note: While not completely without merit in some cases (such as in indexes), the author here makes a case for arranging books in chronological order (most recent last) instead of in alphabetical order by author. This is because, the author argues, patrons want the most recent work on a subject rather than what any particular author has to say about a subject (esp., the author argues, in books on science and technology and biographies). For the most part, this is a weird article. But it, at least, indicates something interesting about how young this subject matter was at the time—that such a thing could be seriously presented.

Article 20

This entry is about:

Minto, John. (1934). The Library Association Examinations. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 285-295. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302074

Note: The twentieth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The Library Association Examinations.”

It was written by John Minto, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Signet Library

Note: In short, this article highlights how extremely challenging it would have been to become a librarian in the United Kingdom in the early to mid-20th century. The examinations required quite a bit of knowledge. Provides a short history of the various library schools that came into existence during the first few decades of the last century.

Reflection: While many of the articles in this special issue are interesting, the issue itself is becoming rather tedious to read through. Previous issues alway contained a good proportion of stimulating material, but this issue seems stressed by the apparent motivation to include a lot of material.

Article 21

This entry is about:

Munthe, Wilhelm. (1934). National Departments in Scandinavian Libraries. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 296-299. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302075

Note: The twenty-first article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “National Departments in Scandinavian.”

It was written by Wilhelm Munthe, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Universitetsbiblioteket

Note: A very respectful response to a critique written by J. C. M. Hanson on the Norwegian:

practice of dividing the books in national libraries into two main divisions, one to hold the books printed or published in the country itself and the second to include all foreign books (p. 296).

Article 22

This entry is about:

Noé, A. C. (1934). The University Library and Research. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 300-305. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302076

Note: The twenty-second article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The University Library and Research.”

It was written by A. C. Noé, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: University of Chicago

Note: Herein is a really interesting argument about the advantages that librarians as bibliographers can provide to scientists who lack the assistants and machinery to produce the equivalent of what scientists in, as the author explicitly names, Germany can produce. The author's analogy:

Does this difference in personnel help permanently to condemn the American professor to a position of relative inferiority in research work? This question can perhaps be answered by a comparison with the American farmer. The latter has also much less help than a western European farmer, and yet he produces more per man than any other agriculturalist in the world. He does it through superior organization of work and through the use of machinery. The same could be true of the American research worker. What he lacks in assistants and technicians could, in a measure, be replaced by organization and machinery—both to be supplied by departments of bibliographic research in university libraries (p. 300).

Article 23

This entry is about:

Pierson, Harriet Wheeler. (1934). The Forest of Pencils: Adventures in Corporate Entry. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 306-313. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302077

Note: The twenty-third article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “The Forest of Pencils: Adventures in Corporate Entry.”

It was written by Harriet Wheeler Pierson, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Library of Congress

Note: Probably the best title in these first volumes so far. Begins with a short history of the Chinese Emporer Taitsung and his founding of a library that lasted for 1200 years only to be burned down during the Boxer rebellion in 1900.

Note: Although this is an important and very complicated topic, I think the following is humorous, and I think, given how this article reads in general, that it is meant to be humorous (see, e.g., last paragraph on page 312):

particularly did he [J. C. M. Hanson] clarify the rules for corporate entry, a subject more open to differences of opinion than, perhaps, any other (p. 307).

Note: Here ya go:

Catalogers are not only transcribers, they are seekers of truth.

Note: I celebrate this author's passion, as I read her voice from the past.

To the uninitiated the profession of cataloging may appear dry and uninteresting; in reality there is no profession which affords so great an opportunity to look into the mirror of life. The revelation is absorbing and full of interesting surprises: a glimpse of beauty in some forgotten volume, a flash of humor from some dusty shelf. The voices of the past are audible, their joy and pain, their triumph and defeat, their ambition and resignation, their eager and unending struggle to solve the mystery of life (p. 313).

Article 24

This entry is about:

Hanson, J. C. M. (1934). Letter to Mr. Hanson. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 314. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302078

Note: The twenty-fourth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Letter to Mr. Hanson.”

It was written by J. C. M. Hanson, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: University of Chicago

Note: This is a very short, humorous half-page letter to J. C. M. Hanson and appears to be from himself too. There is an illegible signature at the end of the letter.

Article 25

This entry is about:

Solberg, Thorvald. (1934). Copyright and Librarians. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 315-328. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302079

Note: The twenty-fifth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Copyright and Librarians.”

It was written by Thorvald Solberg, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Washington, DC (No affiliation)

Note: Important text on early copyright issues for librarians. Rather than the focus today, which is often on term length and reuse, the focus in the early 20th century concerned accessing books printed in foreign nations and the requirement that such books be reprinted by American publishers and printers.

Thorvald Solberg was an important figure in early 20th century copyright reform.

Article 26

This entry is about:

Starr, Helen K. (1934). Mr. Hanson and His Friends. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 329-333. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302080

Note: The twenty-sixth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Mr. Hanson and His Friends.”

It was written by Helen K. Starr, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: James J. Hill Reference Library

Note: This is a really sweet piece that describes some of the personalities of the librarians who worked in the cataloging division of the Library of Congress when J. C. M. Hanson headed the division. The piece is like a gold mine of biographical insight.

Article 27

This entry is about:

Stejneger, Leonhard. (1934). Who Was J. L. S.? The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 334-340. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302081

Note: The twenty-seventh article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Who Was J. L. S.?”

It was written by Leonhard Stejneger, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: United States National Museum

Note: Authorial detective work. The content deals with a history that I am woefully ignorant, but I greatly admire the ability to fashion a narrative concerning tracing the identity of a work.

Article 28

This entry is about:

Tisserant, Eugène. (1934). On the Use of Ultra-Violet Rays for Detecting Repairs in Printed Books, Especially Incunabula. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 341-343. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302082

Note: The twenty-eighth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “On the Use of Ultra-Violet Rays for Detecting Repairs in Printed Books, Especially Incunabula.”

It was written by Eugène Tisserant, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana

Note: A short piece on detecting repair work in rare books. Repair work had advanced and it was sometimes difficult to tell with the naked eye if a work had been treated. The author presents a simple technique for identifying whether a rare book had been fixed.

Article 29

This entry is about:

Trommsdorff, Paul. (1934). Technische Literatur in Deutschen Bibliotheken. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 344-351. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302083

Note: The twenty-ninth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Technische Literatur in Deutschen Bibliotheken.”

It was written by Paul Trommsdorff, who was affiliated with:

Affiliation: Bibliothek der Technischen

Note: I'm not sure what the thesis of this article is, but it's clearly in some sense about the growth of German scientific and technical literature.

Article 30

This entry is about:

Van Hoesen, Henry B., & Kilpatrick, Norman L. (1934). Heights of Books in Relation to Height of Stack Tiers. The Library Quarterly, 4(2), 352-357. url:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4302084

Note: The thirtieth article of the second issue of the fourth volume of The Library Quarterly is titled “Heights of Books in Relation to Height of Stack Tiers.”

It was written by Henry B. Van Hoesen and Norman L. Kilpatrick, who were affiliated with:

Affiliation: Brown University Library

Note: On the most economical and efficient use of shelving. Again, it's utterly important to think about this kind of thing in a library. In many ways, this is a very important topic if only because of the amount of money that is needed to store and care for so many books. However, it's not really clear why this article is in this issue. The only connection to Hanson is the issue of describing the physical dimensions of books in the catalog, but this is only mentioned briefly at the beginning of the article.

Here's a nice quote:

We have recently measured about 100,000 volumes at Brown University. The results are in Table I (p. 355).

And to continue:

This paper should be considered merely tentative and incomplete. Our estimate of 82 per cent for octavos (25 cm. high), Mr. Gerould's estimate of 85 per cent, and the Yale estimate of 87 1/2 per cent (reckoning the octavo at 26 cm. high) may not be so different when we have measured 400,000 volumes instead of 100,000 (p. 357).

And more measuring of books:

Four hundred thousand is quite a lot of books to measure, but it may not be enough, and we should welcome collaboration in further measurements, tabulations, and conclusions (p. 357).
lq/volume-4-issue-2.txt · Last modified: 2017/02/07 08:59 by seanburns